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Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Lyman Cottage Before and After Series: Part 1

I thought for sure by now I'd be a full-fledged home improvement blogger with sponsored posts and a sweet book deal ;-) but somehow I let nearly a year pass without blogging about our renovation (or anything for that matter, yikes!) If you follow me on Instagram, you're probably familiar and perhaps by now even a little tired of my #lymancottage posts. But lately I'm feeling like I haven't actually shared as many before and afters on my Instagram feed as I'd like. My before photos are so poorly lit and dreary that they sort of bring the overall look of my feed down (did I really just write that? I hate my millennial self so much!) I figured the old blog might be a better place to showcase the good, the bad, and the ugly.

First up, our bathroom. The plaster wall above the sink was in poor shape after we removed the medicine cabinet, shelf, and sconces, so it needed to be drywalled, which we did not personally do. After a bad foray into mudding and taping in the spring (which I will tell you more about sometime, maybe after a glass of wine or two...) we decided it was best to leave that kind of work to the pros. We left the white paneling below as-is and just gave it a new coat of paint. In addition to the wall repair, we had the wiring updated and new outlets added. We had new sconces installed, as well as a medicine cabinet, a vanity, and unlacquered brass faucet fixtures.

Looking into the bathroom from the hall:

On the wall opposite the sink, we removed the shelving, updated the toilet and sang "paint it black" to the walls, the ceiling, the crown molding, and the tub. It hides so many imperfections. Black walls are the new black dress.

I've yet to decorate this room (it still needs a roman shade, the perfect étagère for storage next to the sink, just the right kilim rug, hooks, more art, etc.!) All in good time. But if we're only to have one piece of decor right now, I'm glad it's the whale print below by the artist Mary Maguire, whose work belongs on a Wes Anderson set in the best way possible. One of the highlights of my summer is seeing her new work at the Union Antique Fair in Maine.

This is the only full bath in the house, and you can see in the before photo below that it had a great clawfoot tub, but no shower! Rather than remove the tub and build a new shower stall, we had our plumber rig a shower extension for us. If you've ever turned a clawfoot tub into a shower, you know that it requires a PhD to find and install shower curtains for these rigs, and even after all of the hemming and magnets and hooks, you still have gross, wet fabric encroaching in on you while you shower. Not exactly a spa-like experience! We recently had an outdoor shower installed, and have since showered inside zero times. I removed the three curtains that were needed to traverse the rig, and from here on out we'll just use it for baths (but will keep the extension rod for showing in the winter months!)

Extension Shower - It's a love/hate relationship.
 More before and afters to come, stay tuned!

SOURCES

Sconces - Restoration Hardware Starboard Sconce in Antique Brass
Medicine Cabinet - Restoration Hardware Rivet Medicine Cabinet in Antique Brass
Vanity - Water Creation Madison 24" Single Sink in Cashmere
Faucet - Altmans 8" Lav Faucet in Unlacquered Brass
Basket - West Elm Modern Weave Handled Basket
Toilet - Kohler Memoirs 
Wall + Clawfoot Tub Paint: Benjamin Moore"Black"
Floors: Farrow and Ball Slipper Satin mixed in Benjamin Moore Super Spec oil paint